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Vídeo Why the triple axel is such a big deal

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Triple axels can turn skaters into legends. This is why.\n\nWatch the rest of Skate Week, and our other sports explainers, here: http://bit.ly/2FfxM17\n\nSubscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO\n\nNote: The video states Mirai Nagasu was the second American to land a triple axel in competition (this was recorded before her Olympic success). In 2005, American Kimmy Miessner completed a triple axel in national competition, though not world competition. You can read about it here: http://www.espn.com/olympics/news/story?id=1967992\n\nWant to see Tonya' Harding's routine? You can find one version here:\nhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdC5G7CDvbI\n\nIn this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores the triple axel and why it's such a big deal. The figure skating jump is legendary among ice skaters, from Tonya Harding's 1991 triple axel to modern icon Mirai Nagasu's attempts in competition. It turns out that the physics of the triple axel makes it a uniquely difficult jump — and one worth learning about.\n\nAs a forward-edge jump, the mechanics of a triple axel requires technical acumen from skaters while they still try to maintain an artistically interesting performance. Pioneers like Midori Ito and Tonya Harding had to jump, ramp up rotation speed, and then land all while trying to look good. This effort set them apart from competitors like Nancy Kerrigan, but it wasn't easy to land a triple axel in competition.\n\nAnd that difficulty might be why the triple axel endures as the pinnacle of figure skating performance — and why it's sure to light up the 2018 Winter Olympics as well.\n\nVox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com.\n\nWatch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE\nFollow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o\nOr Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H


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